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Tangled Up with Dementia in Parkinson’s Disease

dementia

Sherri Journeying Through

A reader recently posed the following question: “Why are there never any comments on dementia in regards to Parkinson’s disease? It is very real, and 40 percent of Parkinson’s patients deal with it.”

So, I began looking into it. My answer could have been, “Because I don’t want to think about that stuff.”

The idea that this disease could dominate my mind (as opposed to taking over my “brain”), among the other things it’s already taken from me, is frightening. And it’s a real possibility.

It is estimated that 50 to 80 percent of people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) will develop dementia. It takes about 10 years from the onset of PD to develop dementia, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.

In those with PD dementia, “plaques” and “tangles” are present. Plaques (not the kind dentist removes from your teeth) are deposits of a type of protein that form around nerve cells. These little monsters begin to cling to one another and form clumps, plaques, which prevent nerve cells from sending messages to each other properly.

Tangles, not the kind you comb out of your hair, are formed of tau protein, found in nerve cells. They are either on their way or have made it to death row. They bunch together, twisting around each other and forming tangles of nerve cell fibers. While tangling up the parallel strands of tau protein nerve cells, they fall apart, disintegrate, and cripple the cells’ communication system.

While this is going on, unawares to the patient, the plaques and the tangles continue to gather inside of the brain, causing other nice and healthy nerve cells to eventually wither away and die a silent death, leading to shrinkage in the area of the brain in which these little monsters had their fun fest.

Plaques and tangles present further complications in people with Parkinson’s, as these are the hallmark brain changes linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

I warned you. I told you we didn’t want to think about this stuff. But, unfortunately, it’s a part of the reality of Parkinson’s disease we must be aware of, not so we can worry and fret, but so that we can receive treatment sooner rather than later.

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

The post Tangled Up with Dementia in Parkinson’s Disease appeared first on Parkinson’s News Today.

Enduring Through Parkinson’s Disease

endure

Sherri Journeying Through

Someone once said, “Life is hard.”

Someone else said, “Life is hard, and then you die.”

Another said, “Life is hard, but God is good.”

That’s what I’m holding on to — the belief that although life is indeed hard, God is so very good. 

You awake refreshed to the sun on your face through the bedroom window. Outside, a nest of newly hatched finches wait for their morning feed. The moment you step out of bed, the hard part begins. The part where you remember that the car died last night; where you get to work early only to find out you’ve been laid off; where you receive a phone call filled with disturbing or life-altering news.

You step out of bed to conquer the first hurdle of the day, then face another day of hurdle-hopping gone awry. The frustration, grief, disappointment, and despair ooze into the tiny crevices of your heart and permeate your spirit.

Sound fateful? Fateful and familiar and — dare we admit it – even hopeless? Hopeless as though you will never crawl out of the hole you’re in. A very dark place strewn with heartache, hurt, loneliness, and grief. Unexpected tragedies and unfulfilled expectations. It can appear as if our lives are desecrated by these negative feelings, and sometimes they don’t just seem to be – they are.

While we experience heartache and grief as we journey through death and disease, we are reassured that we don’t travel alone. While we walk uneven roads and pass through deep, dark valleys as we run the race set before us, we need to remember this: We have a God who will never leave us, forsake us, or forget us.

Life is hard, but as one of my favorite Christmas cards reads, “The best days are yet to come.” Days filled with unquenchable joy. We thought we couldn’t endure a life with Parkinson’s disease, but we are enduring because He is journeying with us. Never leaving us, never forsaking us, never forgetting us, always with us. Just as He promised.

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

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Broken Crayons Are Not Useless

garden, broken crayon

Sherri Journeying Through

My son and his family were preparing to move. Was I willing to let them go? Yes. Did I want them to go? No. But that was my selfish desire. I have realized that the harder I try to hold on to what I want, the less I allow God to intervene, not just for my good, but for my best. In the process, I have learned not to hold on. And in some instances, I actually do that. In other instances, though, it can be very hard, especially for a fixer. And I am a big fixer.

I want everyone to be happy. Smiling. Content. But that’s not reality. The reality is that it is not up to me to fix everything; it’s not up to me to make everyone happy. 

I realized yesterday that I tend to coddle people. I also realize the world’s happiness has not been made my burden. I am accountable only for myself in how I react to the circumstances that this world throws at me, such as how I will deal with having Parkinson’s disease, what the financial burden will be, and choices others around me will need to make regarding my health. On and on my list goes.

But how I choose to deal with what life throws at me is what matters. Will I choose to smile, knowing that my God is bigger than all of this? Or will I whimper and whine?

Instead of feeling sorry for myself, I want to be strong in every way. I want to support others. Sometimes we need to give “tough” support, the kind that says, “Enough! Get up, live your best, and be thankful that God has given you another day!”

Whether it’s another day walking slow and stiff or another day with the ability to weed my flowers without pain, I want to give it my best.

Sometimes we feel like a broken crayon. No longer valuable. No longer pretty. But broken crayons are still usable and make beautiful colors. We just need to let go of what is keeping us down and give it to God. Let us be usable, like a broken crayon that God is using to complete a beautiful work of art in our broken lives.

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

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Staying Active Versus Exercise

exercise in Parkinson's

Sherri Journeying Through

Whether you ask a group of people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) or your neurologist about the best thing you can do to keep PD at bay or slow down its symptoms, the most common response will likely be “exercise.” Some may say, “Stay active.” But do you realize that staying active and exercising are two different things?

Just about anyone can exercise — jumping jacks, touch your toes, jog around your living room, lift a couple of cans of green beans — but it takes sheer determination to stay active when you are battling a little monster like Parkinson’s disease.

Being active involves more than movement on your part. It includes a state of mind to persevere, to keep putting one foot in front of the other, and to not give up even when you feel like quitting. Being active involves a positive outlook.

It is easy to fall into a state of apathy or depression when fighting a chronic illness, but to try to pull yourself out of one can be downright hard. The gray cloud of despair can last days, weeks, months, even years. Staying active can help sidestep those dark times.

Sitting and watching television can sound relaxing, but when flopping on the couch is your go-to place when you’re feeling down, it may take an act of God to get you back up. Depression feeds depression. Apathy feeds depression. At times you will have to force yourself up off that couch and do something. But force you must. You must stay active. You must not allow yourself to succumb to dark days. Fight and fight hard. Get your friends to join you by coming alongside them. Show them you need them because they do want to be needed at this time in your life.

Exercise is essential for a Parkinson’s patient. Walking, boxing, bicycling, tai chi — these are all terrific forms of exercise as you strive to live healthily with PD. However, to determinedly exercise with PD, you have to “master” staying active. Keep your mind on an even and positive keel. You must tell yourself that you can do this thing; you can battle this little monster. You must say to yourself that as this disease strives to master you, you will fight tooth and nail to push forward and stay active.

Following are some techniques I use in my battle to master PD:

  • Keep your mind active. Do word puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, sudoku games, and more to keep your mind alert.
  • Don’t give in to fear. 
  • Make positive thinking a habit. Carry scripture verses or positive thinking quotes in your pants pocket and read them throughout the day.
  • Don’t give up and don’t give in: mentally, physically, relationally, emotionally, or spiritually.
  • Avoid temptations like empty couches and TV remote controls.
  • Fight the dark days. Don’t let them get the upper hand.
  • Don’t go it alone. Get connected via a support group.

I am in no way an expert in “staying active” but I do make a valiant effort to do so. I have found the above practices to be helpful in dealing with Parkinson’s and hope they are useful to you too.

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

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The ABCs of Parkinson’s Disease: ‘L’ Is for Lists

lists

Sherri Journeying Through

A continuation of the “ABCs of Parkinson’s” series.

Bucket lists are like New Year’s resolutions. We create lists of goals we hope to accomplish, things we want to change for the better, and places we’d like to see. We make pros and cons lists to help us with important decisions.

Lists remind us of important tasks or events. They assist us in goal completion, time management, and grocery shopping. A bucket list consists of experiences and achievements one hopes to fulfill before death calls. That’s the bucket list’s finish line: death. Not dying, but death, because in dying the act of living carries on, even though the quality of life may not be up to our standards. 

Some wonder about the origin of bucket lists. Not me. I just like the idea. But what I don’t like about New Year’s resolutions is how I feel like a loser when I “flake out.” Guilt heaps up. Shame spreads on me like rotten jam on moldy bread. I guess we all heap guilt and shame upon ourselves when we renege on our commitments — but you get my point.

By creating a bucket list, we can often fool ourselves into thinking it will lead us to enjoy life more, accomplish more, make positive changes, and see the wonders of the world.

But what if we have a chronic illness and can’t complete the items on the list? Should we give up on our dreams?

We can feel defeated or choose to make a new list. 

I choose a new list. 

I choose to keep a positive attitude even when the walls of disability seem to close in. We may not be able to do all that we once hoped to, but we can find a different version of our dreams. 

Maybe we can’t take our grandkids to the beach anymore, but we can have picnics in the backyard near the paddling pool. Perhaps the zoo is off-limits because we can’t walk far, but we can rest our legs (and our pride) in a wheelchair. We’d like to take our family out to a movie theater. Instead, why not invite our loved ones over for pizza and a movie at home?

You’ll notice that most of the suggestions on my “new” list involve others. That’s because our loved ones are the most important part of our lists. No list should be without them if we’re going to live well while we are still living.

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

The post The ABCs of Parkinson’s Disease: ‘L’ Is for Lists appeared first on Parkinson’s News Today.

Christmas Gift Ideas for Your Loved One with Parkinson’s

gift ideas

Sherri Journeying Through

Christmas is just around the corner. Black Friday and Cyber Monday are even sooner. For your convenience, I have made a list — and checked it twice — of perfect gift ideas for your favorite person with Parkinson’s disease (PD). 

  • A reacher/grabber bar: Many disabilities limit mobility, so bending over to pick something up can be especially challenging. An aluminum reacher/grabber bar promotes independence in your loved one as they won’t need to ask for help to retrieve dropped items.
  • A terry cloth bathrobe: Any bathrobe would be nice, but I specify terry cloth because it is like a bath towel. The robe can be worn immediately after a shower, and by the time they brush their teeth and brush or dry their hair, they are ready to get dressed. It’s also nice to have a warm robe to wear on cold evenings.
  • An herbal neck wrap: This type of wrap works wonders on stiff necks. It is super simple to make if you like crafts.
  • A Nook or Kindle reader: Fine motor skills, such as page-turning, are challenging for those with Parkinson’s. A touch screen for reading may help. Why not add a gift certificate to cover their first book purchase?
  • A manicure: Personal care tasks such as blow-drying hair and taking care of nails become more difficult as the disease progresses. Why not give your loved one a voucher for a professional manicure? A basic treatment is not too pricey and often includes a hand massage.
  • A smart cane: If you seek peace of mind, the Dring Smart Cane alerts caregivers of falls.

Following are more practical gift ideas:

  • Chapstick (a good stocking filler)
  • slipper socks with treads to prevent slips and falls
  • hand warmer
  • stress balls or hand exercisers
  • gloves, winter hat, and neck scarf
  • electric mattress pad, blanket, or throw
  • heating pad
  • at-home foot spa
  • gel sole shoe inserts
  • neck pillow
  • night lights
  • purifying salt lamp
  • essential oil diffuser
  • humidifier
  • postage stamps and notecards
  • movie voucher
  • ice cream or lunch gift certificates
  • gift certificates for dance, voice, or other PD-specific “exercise” classes
  • a Rock Steady Boxing membership
  • lap tray or desk
  • wheelchair tray or pocket bag
  • weighted eating utensils
  • puzzle books or brain teaser puzzles
  • colored pencils and adult coloring books
  • Roomba robot vacuum

These are just some of my ideas for Christmas gifts for your loved ones. I’d love to hear your suggestions.

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

The post Christmas Gift Ideas for Your Loved One with Parkinson’s appeared first on Parkinson’s News Today.

Finding Hope for Today

 

Sherri Journeying Through

Sometimes you can feel as if you’re at the end of your proverbial rope. You’re holding on as tight as you can, hoping the blisters on the palms of your hands won’t become totally unbearable and you let go.

I was thinking about all that’s going on lately in the world: tsunamis, earthquakes, hurricanes, flooding, wildfires, and tornadoes.

As if that weren’t enough, the likelihood of people diagnosed today with a terminal disease isn’t just likely, it’s a given. The likelihood of people diagnosed with a chronic illness isn’t just probable, it’s going to happen. There is pain and sorrow eating away at our society day by day, and there is no stopping it. Our hope is being challenged left and right while our faith may feel as if it is rapidly dwindling. Is there hope? Can we hold onto our faith and make it to the end without giving up, without giving in?

It is believed that King David of Israel might have had Parkinson’s disease. If that is true, then couldn’t it be possible that some of the other diseases we live with today could have been around during King David’s time? Diseases and illnesses such as breast cancer, migraines, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, dementia, and so much more likely played a part in history. After all, according to Christopher G. Goetz of Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, the “shaking palsy” was first diagnosed by physician James Parkinson in 1817, who described it as a neurological syndrome. Earlier texts, including some from India around 1000 B.C. and some ancient Chinese texts, describe symptoms of what might have been Parkinson’s.

If Parkinson’s disease really did play a role in King David’s life, then it is probable that those diseases from long ago still exist to some degree today. Couldn’t it be more than likely that Parkinson’s is one of those diseases referred to when the Apostle Matthew wrote, “Jesus went through all the towns and villages … healing every disease and sickness.”

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Can you imagine what it would have been like as a person with Parkinson’s disease to be healed on that day? The day of healing every disease and sickness? To be walking down the street one minute, mistaken for a drunk with uncontrolled limbs, slurred speech, and constant tripping? You stop near this man who claims he can heal you and you think, “What have I got to lose?” 

You get yourself in line and you wait. 

And you wait. 

And you wait in a line longer than those in high-security status at the airport. 

You consider turning around to go home, but then you see him. The one who everyone’s talking about. 

You remember the other day when Aunt Martha told you she saw him heal a man with sores all over his skin. And her sister, your Aunt Mary, saw him heal a man who was blind, with some spit and some dirt. 

So, you keep waiting, just a little longer, because you feel hopeful.

He sees you. You’re hard to miss due to all the awkward movements you make. You get to where he is, sitting on a rock and he is waiting for you. As you approach, he stands and offers his rock for you to sit upon. Before you can say anything, he stands behind you and gently puts your head between the palms of his hands. You feel a warmth permeate your entire body. Your body relaxes. Your movements calm. You can’t put into words how you feel, you can only say you don’t feel the same. Something inside happened from your head to your toes.

Were you healed? Could it be?

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If people were healed way back then, why not right now? Today? Why not be hopeful? 

Healing today may not look the same as it did back in Matthew’s time, but it happens. Sometimes it is our perspective or our attitude that needs healing. Perhaps it is our faith that is restored and healed after being tested by the trials of a chronic illness. Perhaps hope is healed after despair rips out our joy and leaves a deep dark pit inside. If your faith began dwindling because of your circumstances, isn’t the gift of renewed faith and hope healing in its own way?

Why not be healed? Why not be hopeful? Hope enables us to live through today’s sicknesses and diseases while expecting something better for tomorrow. Hope tells our heart that help is on the way. 

So, why not be hopeful?

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

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The ABCs of Parkinson’s: ‘K’ Is for Knowledge

knowledge

Sherri Journeying Through

A continuation of the “ABCs of Parkinson’s” series.

When diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD), or any disease, it is always beneficial to educate yourself about it. Ask yourself: Do they know what caused it? What are the symptoms? How can I best care for myself? Is there a cure?

Knowledge is a good and powerful thing. However, too much knowledge can be detrimental to your health.

Upon receiving a Parkinson’s diagnosis, each patient’s reaction will differ from another’s. You may want to know more. You may want to know little or nothing about the disease at first to allow yourself time to adjust or grieve. When you get to the point of wanting to know more about PD, tread carefully and cautiously. While there is a plethora of information out there to soothe those hungry for knowledge, not all sources are created equal.

Look for studies and research carried out by credible institutions and conducted relatively recently. You’ll find articles citing studies published five or more years ago, written as though the research is new. While the information may be still relevant, check if more up-to-date research is available. 

Many publications report on the findings from new studies. Take care not to overwhelm your brain. You don’t have to read all 112 articles on the research; a couple from your favorite publishers will be sufficient unless you are writing a research paper or testing your brain to see how much information it can hold.

Too much knowledge can cause unnecessary anxiety and stress. Parkinson’s is a unique disease for each patient and symptoms, medications, and the effects of treatments can vary from one individual to another.

I’d just finished reading a post on Facebook by a woman who was recently diagnosed with PD and wanted to know what to expect. The very first reply from a disgruntled caregiver who desperately needs a break would have scared the bejeebers out of me if that reply was the first bit of solicited advice I had received.

Go easy on the “knowledge” you give to a newbie. We are here to encourage them on their journey. The last thing they need at the onset of diagnosis is to have the living daylights scared out of them with all of the knowledge we’ve acquired. That wouldn’t be prudent or wise.

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

The post The ABCs of Parkinson’s: ‘K’ Is for Knowledge appeared first on Parkinson’s News Today.

How to Get Through the Cold of Winter

cold

Sherri Journeying Through

Winter has just about landed upon us, and it’s getting to be that time of year when we hang up garden tools, freeze-proof the outside water spigots, and pull out the heavy sweaters and rain boots. For many of us, it also means trying to get warm and comfortable with our Parkinson’s disease while freezing as we watch the snow fall outside our windows.

One of the inconveniences of Parkinson’s is that changes in temperature outside can create pain and discomfort.

When winter slowly creeps upon us, our symptoms can slowly intensify. Sometimes it’s hard to link the weather to our discomfort until one day we realize the seasons have definitely merged from one into another.

The crisp, cool days of autumn are just about over, and the frosty, frigid days of winter are almost here to stay.

Does the cold make your PD more unbearable? Most people with Parkinson’s would respond with a resounding yes. If you aren’t one of those people, be grateful. If you are, by now you’ve probably noticed more stiffness, especially in the evenings as the warmth of whatever sun remains slowly hides behind the horizon.

The winter months can cause your tremors to worsen. They can contribute to an increase in gait problems as well as problems with balance and stiffness. Pain can become your closest friend. 

How can you survive another winter?

When sleeping, try an electric blanket, which hopefully will eliminate the cold that often permeates the body and causes aches. Throw blankets used for the couch now come in heated varieties that make reading or watching TV more pleasant.

If you’re shopping for a new car, don’t forget to check out the heated seat option. They make trips, short or long, easier to bear.

To alleviate stiffness, arnica gel and magnesium spray have worked well for me to loosen up muscles.

Keep your feet warm and wear a sweater or sweatshirt. Layer up. Once you get a chill in your bones, it’s hard to get warm. When you go outside, put on some tights to give you an added layer of warmth. Warm up on the inside with a cup of tea or hot chocolate. And don’t forget the oldest remedy: Snuggle up with a good book in front of a roaring fireplace. If you don’t have a fireplace, light a candle and pretend.

Merry winter!

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

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The Simple Helps Are Big Helps

Sherri Journeying Through

Some people’s reactions to a person with a disability can be disheartening. They stare, make thoughtless comments, point fingers, or whisper. Some people don’t know how to handle a person who has an obvious disease, disability, or illness. They may be uncomfortable around one who is disabled, which can make the disabled feel uncomfortable.

A report by ABC News last August shared the story of a Walmart cashier in Michigan who went out of her way to make a customer feel a little more comfortable, a little more “normal,” with a simple, selfless act: She painted her customer’s fingernails.

That may not seem like a big deal to some, but for those with a disability like cerebral palsy or Parkinson’s disease, it’s a very big deal.

Angela Peters, the customer, shared her story with Ebony Harris, the Walmart cashier. The story went something like this:

Somehow, Ebony heard of Angela being refused service at a nail salon due to her cerebral palsy. Cerebral palsy, like Parkinson’s disease, can cause tremors and involuntary movement of the limbs. Ebony took action, using her break to paint Angela’s nails. The two women set off to choose the perfect color, a sparkly shade of blue, and then seated themselves at the in-store Subway sandwich shop.

Ebony was just doing something simple and kind for another human being, something that most of us can do for ourselves, and yet, sometimes we can’t. Our illness takes away our ability to do something that seems so small and insignificant to others. A friend of mine told me the other day that after having her toenails cut, her feet felt so much better and her toes didn’t hurt anymore. She isn’t able to cut her own nails because she can’t bend over far enough to do it. 

I wonder, with the holidays approaching at lightning speed, if perhaps some nail pampering is the perfect gift to give a loved one. Actually, why wait? We can be like Ebony and give a gift of kindness any time, starting today. Starting now.

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Note: Parkinson’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Parkinson’s News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Parkinson’s disease.

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