Study to Explore Art Therapy for Improving Visuospatial, Motor Function in Parkinson’s Patients

A new exploratory study intends to assess the benefit of art therapy in improving visuospatial function and gait in Parkinson’s disease patients.
The ExplorArtPD study (NCT03178786) is currently recruiting participants in New York City. More information on enrollment can be found here.
The study’s experimental protocol, “Visuospatial exploration and art therapy intervention in patients with Parkinson’s disease: an exploratory therapeutic protocol,” was published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Medicine.
Due to the variety of Parkinson’s motor and non-motor symptoms, including visuospatial dysfunction — loss of space orientation, motion perception, and target localization — effective treatments require multidisciplinary approaches involving physical therapy, occupational therapy, psychological support, family counseling, and palliative care.
When these approaches fail, complementary therapeutic strategies, such as art therapy, may hold potential to help patients restore functional independence and maintain their quality of life.
Although the source of visusospatial dysfunction in Parkinson’s is not fully understood, altered visual function has been consistently shown, with subsequent impaired ability to drive, read, and write, and increased anxiety and depression, as well as a greater risk of falls.
Given the lack of specific therapeutic strategies for visuospatial dysfunction associated with Parkinson’s disease, researchers at the Marlene and Paolo Fresco Institute for Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders at NYU Langone Health developed an art therapy intervention protocol that includes psychotherapy and art creation to address visuospatial dysfunction and psychological needs of Parkinson’s patients.
The study is aimed at determining the characteristics of visuospatial exploration and its neural basis as assessed by clinical and behavioral tests, neuropsychological inventories, eye tracking, gait analysis, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Researchers also intend to assess the therapeutic impact of art therapy on visuospatial dysfunction and gait in Parkinson’s patients.
“According to our preliminary data [art therapy] appears to be a safe, non-invasive, reproducible modality of intervention that could be administered to [Parkinson’s] patients with potential ease of recruitment,” the authors wrote.
The study has an anticipated enrollment of 40 participants, 20 of whom will have a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease and a Hoehn and Yahr scale stage of 2-3 — stage 2 meaning symptoms on both sides of the body, but no balance impairment, and stage 3 referring to balance impairment and mild to moderate disease. They must also have no history of clinically active eye abnormalities, and be eligible to undergo brain MRI scans. Researchers will also include 20 age-matched participants without Parkinson’s disease who will serve as controls.
Parkinson’s patients will undergo open-label art therapy and assessments both before the completion of art projects (baseline) and after completion (follow-up), while control participants will only undergo baseline assessments. In patients with motor fluctuations, the assessments will be made in the “on” state, when motor disability is milder and assessments can be performed with a lower risk of physical or psychological fatigue.
Art therapy will consist of 20 consecutive sessions lasting 90 minutes each, approximately twice per week for a maximum of 14 weeks. It will be administered by credentialed professionals with a master’s degree in art therapy. The approach will favor group dynamics, mutual support, and encouragement through shared projects.

Source: Parkinson's News Today

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *