Motion Machine’s Ability to Ease Motor Symptoms in Parkinson’s Entering Trial in Australia

Parkinson's and balance

A trial in Australia will test a motion machine, called the Reviver, to understand whether it can improve balance, mobility and sensory-motor coordination in people with moderate to advanced Parkinson’s disease and atypical parkinsonism.

Exercise has been shown to help ease Parkinson’s symptoms. The Reviver machine, by Isodymanics, is designed to stimulate the vestibular system, the sensory system that provides a sense of balance and information about body position.

The machine works by placing the user at a tilted angle and rotating them in a slow and radial, wave-like motion.

The reaction to being tilted off-balance can induce a brain response that activates muscles across the body, including those that may be dormant as a result of age, infrequent use, damage, or disability. Specifically, it activates nerve pathways that then aid in balance, enhance muscle strength, and help resist the effects of gravity.

Isodynamics reports early evidence suggesting the Reviver’s use can improve mobility and lessen Parkinson’s symptoms, with patients demonstrating a 22% increase in mobility; namely, quicker “up and go” test times over an average of 26 days. This test measures the time it takes for a person to rise from a chair, walk three meters (about 10 feet), turn around and return, then sit down again.

“The anecdotal results with our patients have been very positive,” Geoffrey Redmond, Reviver’s developer, said in a press release. “We’re really glad to see the Reviver being used in a formal trial.”

The trial will assess whether a 12-week program using the Reviver machine improves balance, mobility, and sensory-motor coordination. It plans to enroll 30 patients with moderate to advanced Parkinson’s disease or atypical parkinsonism. People with atypical disease have some evident Parkinson’s symptoms, like muscle stiffness or balance issues, but who do not respond well to standard medications. Their symptoms are caused by other disorders.

The trial is being overseen by Terry O’Brien, a neurologist at Monash University and led by Ben Sinclair, a brain imaging expert at Monash and with Alfred Health. Participants will be required to attend twice weekly sessions for 12 weeks at The Alfred in Melbourne.

Enrolled patients will be split into two groups, based on their diagnoses. One group will undertake the Reviver exercise regime on top of their standard of care, and the second (a control group) will continue with standard of care without using the Reviver.

Those interested in participating or receiving more information about the trial can call Isodynamics at 02-9524-2188 (in Australia, country code +61) or email the company.

“We now need to see what kind of results can be generated during a formal, randomised controlled trial,” Sinclair said.

“It’s an exciting project because people affected by Parkinson’s have a limited range of treatment options. This study provides a rare opportunity to explore and uncover a new possible treatment pathway for people affected by Parkinson’s,” he added.

The post Motion Machine’s Ability to Ease Motor Symptoms in Parkinson’s Entering Trial in Australia appeared first on Parkinson’s News Today.

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